Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

Who Shot Rock & Roll

Friday, October 23rd, 2009
"Amy Winehouse May 18, 2007;" photograph by Max Vadukul; 24 x 36 in. (61 x 91.4 cm) © Max Vadukul Lender: Max Vadukul; courtesy of Brooklyn Museum of Art

"Amy Winehouse May 18, 2007;" photograph by Max Vadukul; 24 x 36 in. (61 x 91.4 cm) © Max Vadukul Lender: Max Vadukul; courtesy of Brooklyn Museum of Art

Next week,  the Brooklyn Museum opens an exhibit solely devoted to rock ‘n’ roll photographers from 1955 through today.

Who Shot Rock & Roll will feature an impressive collection for sure, featuring around 175 photos by 105 photographers: including everything from Andreas Gursky‘s nine-by-seven-foot tour-de-force of Madonna performing in 2001, to Don Hunstein‘s photo of Bob Dylan walking with then girlfriend Suze Rotolo down a snowy Greenwich Village street, to Dennis Hopper‘s photo of James Brown, surrounded by female fans, to the contact sheet of Bob Gruen‘s portrait of John Lennon in a sleeveless New York City t-shirt, or Amy Winehouse on her wedding day (above), shot by Max Vadukul, and William “Red” Robertson’s 1955 portrait of a pelvis-thrusting Elvis, which later became his first album cover.

Most photos are on loan from the photographers’ personal collections.

The exhibit will also include music videos by artists featured in the exhibit, an 80-image slide show and a rock ‘n’ roll chronology made out of actual album covers.

Who Shot Rock & Roll: A Photographic History opens October 30, 2009, and runs through January 31, 2010. For more info, visit www.brooklynmuseum.org


Paolo Ventura’s Winter Stories

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

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WInter stories sample 2

Winter stories sample 1

Photographer Paolo Ventura builds intricate, miniature sets from found objects (often flea market finds) and shoots them to appear life-size, creating haunting, narrative series. His first book, War Souvenir, explored fictional wartime scenes. His newest book, Winter Stories (just out from Aperture & Contrasto), depicts scenes from the memory bank of a fictional circus performer looking back on his life during his final moments…for more info, visit Ventura’s website.

To read my Graphis interview w/Ventura from a few years ago, click here.

Check out my brand new review for Coolhunting here.

And check out the artist in his own words:

Paolo Ventura on Winter Stories from Aperture Foundation on Vimeo.

Dennis Hopper: Photographs, 1961-1967

Friday, September 25th, 2009

HopperCoverSmall
Check out Coolhunting.com for my review of Taschen‘s limited-edition winter release: Dennis Hopper, Photographs, 1961-1967. It’s an amazing collection featuring several previously unpublished Hopper photographs, and reflects a world in flux in a historical decade—politically, socially and artistically. From the civil rights march at Selma to the art world’s electricity to grittier, urban street scenes, from politicians to writers to artists to complete strangers, Hopper’s camera captured an era…

Picture 1

Also, Coolhunting’s guest-editing Wallpaper.com through September 30th, so you can check out the review there as well!

Pseudodocumentation by David DiMichele

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009
Broken Glass, 2006, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

Broken Glass, 2006, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

Holes, 2009, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

Holes, 2009, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

Bark, 2008, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

Bark, 2008, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

Ice Melting, 2007, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

Ice Melting, 2007, by David DiMichele, from Pseudodocumentation

“Pseudodocumentation,” Los Angeles-based photographer David DiMichele’s current exhibit at Randall Scott Gallery,  is a playful examination of scale and perception. DiMichele’s subjects find themselves in dramatic surroundings – encircled by towers of melting ice, daunting slashes of bark, shards of glass –  and while intimidating, these are also simultaneously beautiful settings. But these images aren’t achieved in grand halls, museums or cavernous warehouses – no, they’re constructed at the artist’s studio table as detailed dioramas. 

Further, DiMichele’s “Pseudodocumentary”  photos make a statement about how we – the audience – see and experience the monumental art that they pay homage to. Most people don’t always have access to the first-hand experience of the type of  major installations portrayed in DiMichele’s photographs. More often, we see images of such exhibits through reproductions or websites.

DiMichele’s series is on display through October 17th at:

Randall Scott Gallery
111 Front Street #204
Brooklyn, NY 11201
212-796-2190

The White Rabbit: Photos by Albert Watson

Monday, September 14th, 2009

“In Alice in wonderland, when the white rabbit vanished down the hole, we encounter many strange and surreal visions. I thought the white rabbit would be a good metaphor for this exhibition.” -Albert Watson

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This week, famed photographer Albert Watson‘s new exhibit, The White Rabbit, opens at Italy’s Forma gallery. In the new series, Watson takes on the role of the white rabbit from Alice in Wonderland, and invites his audience on a trip through his photographic world – one made of stunning portraits (many celebrity), fashion photography, his recent Las Vegas series, grandiose panoramas and brand new photographs.

Watson was born in Scotland in 1942. After finishing his studies at the Royal College of Art in London, he moved to the USA at the beginning of the seventies. He opened a studio in Los Angeles and in New York. Despite a serious physical disability (he is blind in one eye) he soon became famous as a fashion and portrait photographer, for magazines such as Vogue, Rolling Stone, The Face, VIBE and Newsweek, and his work has appeared on the cover of leading international publications. Apart from creating several advertising campaigns for cosmetics and clothing corporations such as Gap, Levi’s, Revlon and Chanel, he has directed over 500 TV commercials and short movies. In his frequent travels all over the world, from Morocco to Europe and the USA, he has consolidated his own very precise vision, which makes him a reference for originality, innovation and language. His work has been collected in important photography books, including Cyclops (1994), Maroc (1998) and in major solo exhibitions.

For more information, check out www.formafoto.it
Photo above by Albert Watson.