Posts Tagged ‘Exhibit’

Kandinsky at the Guggenheim

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009
Vasily Kandinsky's "Composition 8" (Komposition 8), July 1923 Oil on canvas, 55 1/8 x 79 1/8 inches (140 x 201 cm) Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift. 37.262

Vasily Kandinsky's "Composition 8" (Komposition 8), July 1923 Oil on canvas, 55 1/8 x 79 1/8 inches (140 x 201 cm) Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift. 37.262

Vasily Kandinsky, "Blue Segment" (Blaues Segment), 1921 Oil on canvas, 47 1/2 x 55 1/8 inches (120.6 x 140.1 cm) Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection. 49.1181

Vasily Kandinsky, "Blue Segment" (Blaues Segment), 1921 Oil on canvas, 47 1/2 x 55 1/8 inches (120.6 x 140.1 cm) Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection. 49.1181

”]Vasily Kandinsky, "Improvisation 28" (second version) (Improvisation 28 [zweite Fassung]), 1912 Oil on canvas, 43 7/8 x 63 7/8 inches (111.4 x 162.1 cm) Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift. 37.239

This month, the Guggenheim NY presents a full-scale retropsective of Vasily Kandinsky’s paintings. “Kandinsky” will include nearly 100 of the artist’s most important canvases, all from 1907 to 1942, and drawing from the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in New York, and the Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus und Kunstbau in Munich, along with significant private and public collections.

The retrospective will focus on Kandinsky’s oeuvre and the major events that informed his life: two world wars and the Russian revolutions. Despite these events, or perhaps because of them, Kandinsky’s work did not develop in detachment or isolation. It will also consider his thematic motifs, like the horse and rider, mountainous landscapes, seascapes and apocalyptic imagery . The exhibit was shown at the Centre Pompidou and at the Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus und Kunstbau, Munich before coming to the Guggenheim.

Interestingly, Solomon R. Guggenheim himself began collecting Kandinsky’s work in 1929. Guggenheim even visited Kandisnky in Germany in 1930 at the Bauhaus, and purchased over 150 Kandinsky paintings over his lifetime. The upcoming exhibit coincides with the museum’s 50th anniversary celebrations. It runs through January 2010.

For more information, visit the Guggenheim.
Images courtesy of the Guggenheim.

Tim Burton at MoMA

Wednesday, August 26th, 2009

Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993); Directed by Henry Selick; Shown: Sally, Jack Skellington; Credit:Touchstone/Photofest  ©Touchstone Pictures

Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993); Directed by Henry Selick; Shown: Sally, Jack Skellington; Credit:Touchstone/Photofest ©Touchstone Pictures


Beetlejuice (1988) aka Beetle Juice; Directed by Tim Burton Shown (center):Michael Keaton (as Beetlejuice); Credit:Warner Bros./Photofest; © Warner Bros.

Beetlejuice (1988) aka Beetle Juice; Directed by Tim Burton Shown (center):Michael Keaton (as Beetlejuice); Credit:Warner Bros./Photofest; © Warner Bros.


Tim Burton. (American, b. 1958); Untitled (The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy and Other Stories); 1982–1984; Pen and ink, marker, and colored pencil on paper, 10 x 9" (25.4 x 22.9 cm);  Private Collection; © 2009 Tim Burton

Tim Burton. (American, b. 1958); Untitled (The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy and Other Stories); 1982–1984; Pen and ink, marker, and colored pencil on paper, 10 x 9\


Tim Burton; (American, b. 1958); Blue Girl with Wine. c. 1997; Oil on canvas, 28 x 22" (71.1 x 55.9 cm); Private Collection; © 2009 Tim Burton

Tim Burton; (American, b. 1958); Blue Girl with Wine. c. 1997; Oil on canvas, 28 x 22\

Throughout his career, Tim Burton has always pushed the cinematic envelope. This November, the Museum of Modern Art presents a major retrospective of his work. Tim Burton considers his evolution as both a director and concept artist for live-action and animated films, and as an artist, illustrator, photographer and writer. The show will trace Burton’s creative history, from his earliest childhood drawings through his mature work in film.

The exhibition will bring together over 700 examples of rarely or never-before-seen drawings, paintings, photographs, storyboards, moving-image works, puppets, maquettes, costumes, and cinematic ephemera, and include an extensive film series spanning Burton’s 27-year career. Artworks and objects will be drawn primarily from the artist’s personal archive, as well as studio archives and the private collections of Burton’s collaborators. His student films and early, nonprofessional films will also be on display. International and domestic posters from Burton’s films will be on display in the theater lobby galleries.

The show will also include little-known drawings, paintings, and sculptures created in the spirit of contemporary Pop Surrealism, as well as work generated during the conception and production of his films, such as original The Nightmare Before Christmas and Corpse Bride puppets; Edward Scissorhands, Batman Returns, and Sleepy Hollow costumes; and even severed-head props from Mars Attacks!

In conjunction with Tim Burton, MoMA presents The Lurid Beauty of Monsters, a series of films that influenced, inspired, and intrigued Burton. Taking as its starting point a screening of
horror movies that Burton organized in Burbank in 1977, the series includes such films as Jason
and the Argonauts
(Don Chaffey, 1963), Frankenstein (James Whale, 1931), The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920), The Pit and the Pendulum (Roger Corman, 1961), Nosferatu (F. W. Murnau, 1922), and Earthquake (Mark Robson, 1974), and will be screened from December 2, 2009 to April 26, 2010.

The show runs through April 2010.
Images courtesy of MoMA. For more info, visit www.moma.org